Saturday, October 31, 2009

Herstoryan's Hearth: The Rural Cook Book (1907)






Excerpts from The Rural Cook Book (1907):


For many years The R. N. Y. has been collecting tested recipes from an immense army of practical housewives. Some are entirely original; others are doubtless modifications of familiar practice. 

"Here are some certain rules of health; 
Take them - they're better far than wealth: 
Don't overeat, don't overdrink, 
Don't overwork, don't overthink, 
Be not afraid of honest sweat; 
Run like a deer from shame and debt. 
Beware of bigness of the head. 
Get bigness of the soul instead."

Macaroni with Cheese. - Throw one-half box of macaroni into boiling water and cook 20 minutes. Never let the water stop boiling, or the macaroni will be soft. Drain and pour into a buttered baking dish. Have ready one cup of cheese cut into small pieces and stir this through the hot macaroni together with salt and pepper to taste and a lump of butter the size of a small egg. Add enough sweet milk almost to cover and sprinkle the top with more grated cheese. Bake three-quarters of an hour in a moderate oven. A good supper dish on a cold night. (p.187)

Okra, Creole Style. - Wash, trim and cut into slices a quart of young, tender okra; place in a granite saucepan two teaspoonfuls of butter, a medium-sized onion, a medium-sized green pepper, both minced fine; stir over the fire until a golden brown, then add three large tomatoes peeled and cut into pieces, three tablespoons of Spanish or some hot pepper sauce and salt to taste, and the okra. Cover the saucepan and simmer gently for half an hour. Turn out on a hot dish and sprinkle over with a teaspoonful of minced parsley and serve. (p.118)

  •  The Rural Cook Book. The Rural New Yorker: New York. 1907 (pp 7, 118, 187)
  • Image from: Hall, Eugene J. Poems of the Farm and Fireside. Chicago: Jansen, McClurg & Company. 1875 (title page)

Friday, October 30, 2009

Letter from Catherine Latham (1919)




     In the "Minutes of the Fifty-Sixth Annual Session of the Salem Missionary Baptist Association," held the weekend of 02 Oct 1919, a letter Catherine A. (Goodson) Latham, to the Association is printed. She wished to bid them farewell since she had been confined to bed for several months and was in poor health. The Minutes refer to Sister C. A. Latham and Elder O. H. Latham as esteemed members who spent their lives as faithful servants in the ministry within the bounds of Salem Association. 
A Letter was received by the Association from Sister C. A. Latham, wife of Elder O. H. Latham, now deceased, which was read by Bros. W. A. S. Jinkins, and on motion Bro. W. A. S. Jenkins was appointed to write a letter of greeting and that a copy be spread on the minutes of this Association, and also one be sent to Sister Latham. Letter and answer as follows:
Dear Brethren and Sisters in Christ:
     I feel impressed by the Holy Spirit to write you a few lines. It has been four years since I met with you at Cornett. It has been my lot to be an invalid for three years. I have been in bed for four months. It is for my good, for "all things work together for good to them that love God." I know that I love Him and that He loves me, for He has been so merciful and kind to me. 
     Brothers and sisters, I ask you all in God's great name to be faithful and true to God and His great cause, for there are so many things to lead people away from God. Pray for me that I may bear my affliction with patience. He is going to say some sweet day after awhile "that's enough, come up higher." That is all and all to me to know this.
     Farewell brothers and sisters. If I never meet you any more in this world all be good and meet me in Heaven. 
                                                                                      Your Sister in Christ, 
                                                                                          MRS. C. A. LATHAM.
     The above letter was received by the Association from Sister C. A. Latham, surviving widow of Elder O. H. Latham, deceased, who passed to his reward several years ago after a life spent in the ministry within the bounds of Salem Association. 
     Sister Latham has always been esteemed by members of this Association who knew her as a zealous and faithful christian mother and worker in the Master's cause, which made her letter appreciated the more by this body. On motion Bros. W. A. S. Jenkins was appointed to draft a reply to this highly appreciated letter, who reported the following:
     Resolved, that this Association as a body feels deeply the interest shown by her letter and her prayers. That it extends to Sister Latham its deepest sympathy in her afflictions and commends her to Him who is above all and over all; who hath said that I will be with you in the sixth trouble and in the seventh I will not forsake thee. 
     That special prayer be offered in her behalf.
     And be it further resolved, that a copy of her letter and this resolution be spread upon the minutes of this Association and a copy be furnished Sister Latham. 
                                                                                       Respectfully submitted, 
                                                                                                 W. A. S. JENKINS.
  • "Minutes of the Fifty-Sixth Annual Session of the Salem Missionary Baptist Association held with the Cross Roads Baptist Church Six Miles Northeast of Hughes Springs, Texas. October 2, 3, and 4, 1919." Booklet. Atlanta, Texas: The Citizen Journal Press. 1919 p 4


    Thursday, October 29, 2009

    Happy Birthday: Ida Luetta Latham Wells (1871)



    Happy Birthday to my great great grandmother, Ida Luetta Latham, who was born 138 years ago today!





    Ida was born in Cass County near Linden, Texas on the 29th of October 1871. Her parents were Reverend Obediah H. and Catherine A. (Goodson) Latham. She married Samuel Micah Wells on 30 Jan 1894 in Cass County, Texas. Samuel was born 21 Oct 1859 Macon, GA and died 25 Dec 1939 near Linden, Cass County, Texas. He was the son of William J. and Parthena (Martin) Wells


    During Ida's childhood Linden had less than 300 residents and the main industries were lumber and cotton.1 The soil was hard so family gardens mainly held corn, sweet potatoes, and varieties of peas.2 There were several small settlements/communities in the rural areas surrounding Linden. The Latham and Wells families lived near the settlement of Cave Springs. It is believed that Ida's father Rev. O. H. Latham was the pastor of the baptist church at Cave Springs. In the "Minutes of the Fifty-Sixth Annual Session of the Salem Missionary Baptist Association," held the weekend of 02 Oct 1919, Ida's husband, Samuel, is listed as an elected Bros. of Caves Springs Church. In the same bulletin a letter from Ida's mother, Catherine, to the Association is printed. She wished to bid them farewell since she had been confined to bed for several months and was in poor health. The Minutes refer to Sister C. A. Latham and Elder O. H. Latham as esteemed members who spent their lives as faithful servants in the ministry within the bounds of Salem Association. 


    Samuel and Ida had three sons: Curtis William b. 1894; Ottis Oscar b. 6 Aug 1896; and Hardy Obediah b. 1899. 



    The family is listed in the 1900, 1910, and 1920 Federal Census records for Cass County, TX.


    Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Justice Precinct 2, Cass, Texas; Roll  T623_1618; Page: 10B; Enumeration District: 21.



    Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1910. T624, 1,178 rolls. Justice Precinct 2, Cass, Texas; Roll  T624_1537; Page: 10A; Enumeration District: 28; Image: 811.



    Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920; (National Archives Microfilm Publication T625, 2076 rolls); Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29; National Archives, Washington, D.C. ustice Precinct 1, Cass, Texas; Roll  T625_1785; Page: 2B; Enumeration District: 31; Image: 643.


    Samuel Micah Wells was known fondly around town as Uncle Sam. He owned the Wells General Store located in the Cave Springs area "near the railroad tracks." He also owned a farm near the same location. 


    Ida's rural East Texas life was filled with family, friends, and community. She was raised strong in the church; worked hard as a farmer's wife; reared three sturdy, country boys; was married for 45 years, and bore a widow for four. Ida passed away on 25 Jun 1943 and is buried next to her husband in Cave Springs Cemetery south of Linden. 


    Sources:


    Wednesday, October 28, 2009

    Wordless Wednesday: Sidney Perkins Family (1906)




    Sidney Perkins Family, Farmhouse, Sardis Community, Cass County, Texas. Photograph. c1906 Privately held by Herstoryan, Houston, Texas. 2009


    Pictured:
     Sidney Leander (Lee) Perkins: 21 Feb 1870 Coffeeville, Yalobusha, Mississippi - 19 Nov 1957 Hughes Springs, Cass, TX
    Ora Alberta Blanton Perkins: 1880/2, Cass, TX - 1963, Cass, TX
    Ola Mae Perkins Hogan: 10 Sept 1900, Cass, TX - 29 Jun 1986 Marion, TX
    Vera Perkins: 1903, Cass, TX - unknown
    Odis H. Perkins: 1896 - unknown

    Tuesday, October 27, 2009

    Tombstone Tuesday - Amanda Cross (1890)


    Headstone: Amanda Cross, 1890. Blackland Cemetery, Blackland, Rockwall County, Texas. Photograph by Herstoryan. Houston, Texas. 2001


    Amanda died in childbirth and is buried next to her precious baby.

    Find A Grave, Inc., Find A Grave, digital image (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 27 October 2009), photograph, “gravestone for Baby (Inf. of Arthur and Amanda Cross)(1890), Memorial No. 30199404, Records of Blackland Cemetery, Blackland, Rockwall County, Texas;” photograph © Cam Thompson.






    Headstone: A F (Arthur Franklin)  Cross, 1894. Blackland Cemetery, Blackland, Rockwall County, Texas. Photograph by Herstoryan. Houston, Texas. 2001



    Family say that as soon as the funeral was over Arthur left his children at their mother's gravesite. J. P. Bailey took the children to his farm but it was a very minimal and hard life. They worked his farm, and he fed them only cornbread with milk and honey.


    My grandfather, William Eugene Tyler,  made these headstones sometime in the 1980's. 


    Sunday, October 25, 2009

    SNGF: Most Unique Ancestral Name: Fannie Clutts Pitts

    Thank you to Randy Seaver of Geneamusings for tonight's Saturday Night Genealogy Fun misson.



    I have a scroll....in a box left by my grandmother. On the scroll are hundreds of names, hand drawn circles, and squares. Each 8 1/2 x 11 piece of paper is linked to its neighbor with yellowed, brittle tape. Where  did she get all the names? Not one single source is listed. But I have a scroll...and it is a start!


    Herein lies my most favorite ancestral name. The honor goes to my 3rd great grandmother, Fannie Clutts Pitts.
    Her husband is listed as John (Jay) Perkins.


    She is as much of a mystery to me as how she got her name or even if it is her real name.


    Let's look at the evidence I have so far. My great great grandfather was Sidney Leander Perkins, 1870-1957 (aka Sidney Lee Perkins). His death certificate from Cass County Texas lists his father's name as Jay Perkins and his mother as unknown. Sidney's birthplace is listed as Yalobusha, Mississippi. The informant was his son Leon Perkins.


    The 1870 Federal Census for Yalobusha County, MS shows the following family that I believe may be the family of Jay Perkins:

    Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Ninth Census of the United States, 1870. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1870. Township 25, Yalobusha, Mississippi; Roll  M593_754; Page: 131; Image: 266.


    First let us see what is listed on our scroll for this family:
    John (Jay) Perkins b. 09 Feb 1847 m. Fannie Clutts Pitts b. unknown
    Children: John Hugh b. 15 Sept 1868; Sidney Leander b. 21 Feb 1870; Edward Wallace b. 09 Sept 1873. 


    The head of household is listed in the 1870 search index as Jehue R. Perkins b. 1847. Could this actually be "J. Hugh" since the eldest son is named J. Hugh it is something to consider especially if the Head of the household went by "Jay" which appears to be the case if the information in the scroll is correct. The birthdate matches. 


    The wife is listed as Jennie F. Could this be Fannie or a previous wife? Hum, maybe. The oldest son is listed as Hugh J. b. 1868/9. Could this be our John Hugh b. 1868? Then there is Sidney A. b. 1870. Could this be our Sidney Leander b. 1870? 


    I am not convinced, but there are strong similarities that deserve further consideration. 


    The 1880 Federal Census for Yalobusha County, MS shows the following family living in Coffeeville that I believe may be the family of Jay Perkins:


    Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005. 1880 Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1880. Coffeeville, Yalobusha, Mississippi; Roll  T9_669; Family History Film: 1254669; Page: 180.4000; Enumeration District: 207; Image: 0564.


    This data more clearly matches the information we found in the scroll. It clearly shows the Head of Household's initials as J. H. so it is possible that Jehue could actually be "J. Hugh." Age is correct. Need more evidence. This time the wife is listed as Fanny with the correct age. Eldest son is H. J., age is correct. S. L. A. could be our Sidney Leander *note-the A initial is tied into the 1870 Sidney A. reference. Could our census taker have heard "Sidney Lee Ander?"Maybe, age is correct. W. W. could be Edward Wallace age is also correct. Thus, the data is still very similar. Though not conclusive it merits further investigation.


    At the moment this is all the information I have on Fannie and her family. She and her husband apparently deceased prior to the 1900 Federal Census. The scroll lists the dates of death as 1890 for Jay and 1896 for Fannie.


    Gameplan:


    • Search cemeteries in Yalobusha county near Coffeeville, Mississippi for interments. 
    • See if Yalobusha county has probate records for the period 1860-1900. 
    • Search probate records of Yalobusha county for Jay and Fannie Perkins. 
    • Search probate records of Yalobusha county for Thomas Anderson Perkins, possible brother to Jay Perkins, died 1860. Look for relationship evidence. 
    • Search probate records of Yalobusha county for Edmund Perkins, possible father of Jay Perkins, died 1862. Look for relationship evidence. 
    • Search marriage records of Yalobusha county for evidence of union between Jay Perkins and Fannie Clutts Pitts. 
    Until then...I have a scroll...with lots of names, and hey, it's a start!




    Updates:


    • Fanny/Fannie was a common nickname for Frances/Francis. Could our Fannie have been Jennie Frances (Jennie F.) as in the 1870 census?
    • The 1870 Census lists Elmira J. (b: c1845 AL) and Wm C. Stutz (b: c1857 AL). Could these be siblings of Jennie F. whereas Stutz is a misspelled Clutts? hmm...
    Bingo! Thank you for naming your child Elmira Clutts! The 1860 Federal Census shows the following family in Marion County, Alabama that I believe may show Fannie (Frances), Elmira, and William C. as siblings:

    Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Eighth Census of the United States, 1860. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1860. M653, 1,438 rolls. North Western Division, Madison, Alabama; Roll  M653_15; Page: 36; Image: 37.

    Jas B. Clutts (James ?) 37 born c1823 AL
    Cassa Clutts 42 born c1818 TN listed as Blind
    Martha Clutts 17 born c1843 AL
    Elmira Clutts 15 born c1845 AL
    Mary Clutts 13 born c1847 AL
    Frances Clutts 11 born c1849 AL
    John F Clutts 10 born c1850 AL
    Thos Clutts 8 born c1852 AL
    Wm C Clutts 6 born c1854 AL


    • If that is the case and Fannie's maiden name is Clutts then where does the Pitts come from?
    The scroll lists John "Jay" Perkins death date as 1890 if that is the case then he died at age 43. Fannie was about 41 and still had minor children. Could she have remarried before she died 6 years later at age 47? There were Pitts living in Yalobusha County according to tax and census records. That would explain why she is listed as Fannie Clutts Pitts on the scroll. Good lead...


    • Need to search marriage records between 1890 and 1896 in Yalobusha County, MS for a union between Fannie Perkins and unknown Pitts.  
    Found Marriage bond for J. H. Perkins and Fannie Clutts 3 Oct 1867 Fayette, Tennessee.

    Ancestry.com. Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008. Original data: Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002. Nashville, TN, USA: Tennessee State Library and Archives. Microfilm.



    Saturday, October 24, 2009

    Surname Saturday: ABC's


    I think Surname Saturday is a great idea! I have a tendency to concentrate on a few of my favorite surname lines and neglect the rest. This is a great opportunity to give some of those benched surnames some playing time! Here is my team roster for the next several weeks:



    Amyx                            
    Blanton                             
    Creel                               
    Dyer                         
    Elderkin                            
    Felker                            
    Goodson                       
    Hogue                                   
    Irwin
    Judson 
    King
    Lynch
    McCaskill      
    Neal 
    Owens
    Perkins 
    Q       
    Raymond
    Schriver
    Tyler
    Upshaw
    Vaughn
    Wells
    X
    Young
    Zachary


    Now I have a whole week to work on a post for Amyx!


    Thank you to The Graphics Fairy for the Vintage Clipart!


    Thursday, October 22, 2009

    Herstoryan's Hearth: The Making of a Housewife (1906)



    Excerpt from Curtis, Isabel Gordon. The Making of a Housewife. New York: Stokes, 1906. pp 10-11


    *Note: This is one of my most favorite books! I inherited my copy from my grandmother which was her mother's and quite possibly her grandmother's book. It is an instruction manuel that reads as a heartwarming story of a young wife learning the "dignity of household labor." It is a wonderful window into the daily operations of our foremothers' lives.     


         "You are just learning to be a housekeeper, then?" said Mrs. Griswold, kindly. 
         "Yes, just learning. My home since childhood was with my grandmother in a big city hotel, except when I went to boarding-school and college. I don't believe I had been inside two kitchens in my life till I entered my own."
         "You must let me help you," said Mrs. Griswold, heartily. "Polly says you're the neighborliest neighbor we ever had. You must let me be the neighborliest neighbor to you."
         "Thank you so much. May I ask you questions about bread? I've read cook-books, but--"
         "Cook-books won't teach you everything there is to learn about bread. I'm convinced of that. The author of a cook-book knows the science of yeast's leavening labor; she knows flours as well as a miller does; she has arrived at her knowledge of bread-making by years of experience and a multitude of by-ways which could not be put into a hundred-page volume. She boils down this knowledge into a recipe and directions which we follow time after time, making bread better each day, and puzzling out for ourselves the things the author of the cook-book could not tell us."
         "Did you ever have a bread failure?" asked Margaret.
         "Many and many a failure. I shall never forget one which happened when I was young and inexperienced, as you are. We had gone to housekeeping in a little flat at the top of a big apartment house. I set bread one day, but I had not patience to allow it to rise. I imagined the yeast was poor, so before I went to bed I added another yeast-cake, kneaded it, and set it in the pantry window. It was very hot weather, I remember. Early next morning the janitor came to ask what was dripping from our window. Down the red brick wall - five stories down - trickled a stream of bubbling white dough. My bread-pan held nothing but a few dough balloons. I remember my husband paid the janitor two dollars to scrape off the mess."

    Wednesday, October 21, 2009

    Citation: Is it ever okay to enhance the standard? Opinions, Please...


    For today's Wordless Wednesday I posted an image of a headstone I found on Findagrave.com. I wanted to give credit where credit was due so I searched the web to find out how to cite my source. Two websites generated the following using the MLA style to cite an image located in an online database: 


    • Option A: Dunn, Walter. Findagrave.com. Digital Image. [Headstone: Mary N. Massey]. Web. 21 Oct 2009
    • Option B: Dunn, Walter. Headstone: Mary N. Massey.  N.d. Findagrave.com. N.p., 4 Sept. 2006. Web. 21 Oct. 2009.


    [http://www.noodletools.com generator; www.bibme.org generator; http://www.ccsf.edu/Library/imagecitationformat.htm reference]


    I completely understand that as a genealogist one should used the current accepted form of citation to cite sources; however, in this circumstance I feel that the standard form is greatly lacking. What to do?


    Here is how I chose to cite the image:


    • Headstone: Mary Nancy McCaskill Massey. 1974. Llano Cemetery, Amarillo, Texas. Digital Image by Walter Dunn. Findagrave.com Memorial #15616487 created 04 Sept 2006. Accessed 21 Oct 2009


    My questions are: 


    • Is it ever acceptable to enhance the standard form of citing a source by including more details that might be of interest to a researcher?
    • If so, is it acceptable to rearrange the format to increase clarity: 
      • Option C: Headstone: Mary Nancy McCaskill Massey. 1974. Llano Cemetery, Amarillo, Texas. Digital Image by Walter Dunn. Findagrave.com Memorial #15616487 created 04 Sept 2006. Accessed 21 Oct 2009
    • OR should the added information be placed at the end: 
      • Option D: Dunn, Walter. Findagrave.com. Digital Image. [Headstone: Mary N. Massey]. Web. 21 Oct 2009 (Mary Nancy McCaskill Massey, Llano Cemetery, Amarillo, Texas. Find A Grave Memorial #15616487 created 04 Sept 2006)
    If I were writing a research paper for college I obviously would not enhance the citation. In considering that the purpose of the headstone image citation is to promote genealogical research and I am placing it on my personal blog then is it acceptable to enhance it?


    I would LOVE your opinion!
    ________________________________
    Well, seek and you shall find! Two amazing geneabloggers crafted awesome responses to my questions: Thomas MacEntee and FootnoteMaven. Thank you! Here is my revised citation:


    Find A Grave, Inc., Find A Grave, digital image (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 21 October 2009), photograph, “gravestone for Mary Nancy McCaskill Massey (1881-1974), Memorial No. 15616487, Records of the Llano Cemetery, Amarillo, Texas;” photograph © Walter Dunn.


    Read more: FootnoteMaven's discussion with Elizabeth Shown Mills



    Wordless Wednesday: Mary Nancy (McCaskill) Massey




    Mary Nancy McCaskill, Amarillo, Texas. Photograph. c1947-1950. Privately held by Herstoryan, Houston, Texas. 2009


    Photo mostly likely taken at 2401 NW 8th Street, Amarillo, Texas according to granddaughter, living Tyler. She also identified the man as Mary's son Carl Massey.
                               
    Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008. Original data: Amarillo City Directory, 1942-1943. Hudspeth Directory Co. 1942 p 279. Statement of Use: Limited Use License, "Online or other republication of Content is prohibited except as unique data elements that are part of a unique family history or genealogy." Restricted from further use. 



    Headstone: Mary Nancy McCaskill Massey. 1974. Llano Cemetery, Amarillo, Texas. Digital Image by Walter Dunn. Findagrave.com Memorial #15616487 created 04 Sept 2006. Accessed 21 Oct 2009

    Revised Citation for above image: 

    Find A Grave, Inc., Find A Grave, digital image (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 21 October 2009), photograph, “gravestone for Mary Nancy McCaskill Massey (1881-1974), Memorial No. 15616487, Records of the Llano Cemetery, Amarillo, Texas;” photograph © Walter Dunn.


    Read more: http://destinationaustinfamily.blogspot.com/2009/10/how-to-cite-find-grave-headstone.html#ixzz0UapvFoIN 
    http://www.footnotemaven.com/2009/10/good-citations-question.html
    http://www.footnotemaven.com/2009/10/citation-geeks-elizabeth-shown-mills.html



    Mary Nancy McCaskill 
    Born: 02 Feb 1881 in Texas
    Married: 01 Jul 1900 Hunt County, Texas to Robert E. Lee Massey
    Died: 08 June 1974 High Plains Baptist Hospital, Amarillo, Randall, Texas
    Burial: Llano Cemetery, Amarillo, Texas


    Parents of Mary Nancy listed on Death Certificate: Alexander J. McCaskill and Amanda F. Waters


    Children of Robert and Mary Massey:
    - Unknown Child Massey: 1900-1910
    - Vernon Morris Massey: 1902-1970
    - William Alexander Massey: 1905-
    - Thelma Massey: 1908-
    - Elon Massey: 1914-
    - Carl Massey: 1918-